Lagom

Lagom

Just the right amount.

I can’t remember a time I haven’t felt a strong connection to photography. Being able to photograph the world as I see it and then share that with others gives me great joy. 

A word with no literal english translation except something along the lines of “just right”, Lagom seemed the perfect word to choose for my photo series.

I found out last year that someone close to me has suffered from an eating disorder for nearly half of her life. It crept into her life ever so slowly over the years, seeking control. I may never personally know the amount of courage and determination it takes to get through an eating disorder, but I sure know the incredible inspiration of the woman she is to me, and how privileged I feel to have the chance to photograph this journey of hers.

Through the years I have known her and through the chats we’ve had regarding this photo series, we decided on the word Lagom and how her body is just right. No body is perfect; I hope we allhave the ability to come to terms with that at some point in our lives. This series was not about documenting an eating disorder, but a way to illustrate an individual healing process and journey of self acceptance.

Staying grounded amongst nature and being connected with her body and mind is something essential to her personal self acceptance and body-loving healing process. Simple yet fulfilling tasks like her soothing morning coffee, yoga, and being surrounded by nature keep her within each present moment, living mindfully. This is what feel I have captured.

This photography series required capturing photos in black and white. With the ability to strip away even the most vibrant colours and make way for strong emotions and simplicity, I believe black and white photos are classic; they will never grow tired. 

I used black and white through this series to bring strength and emotion to each image; to really freeze each moment and simplify its appearance through photographs to emphasise how uncomplicated these grounding exercises are.

Throughout my photos I have used different settings to convey different emotions and meanings. Wide apertures announce focus of small details while narrow apertures welcome a whole scene. Slow shutter speeds create a sense of calm stillness while fast shutter speeds freeze those moments that we often take for granted.

I also chose to include a double exposure as the last photograph of the series: a thoughtful silhouette juxtaposed with tumbling waves turned right side up. I used these to signify both an overcrowded mind dominated by unhealthy thoughts, and also imply the importance of turning those thoughts on their head to make way for self acceptance and self reflection.

This project has been such an important one for me as it has allowed me to return to my photography background while encouraging me in undertaking the challenge of creating a series of something close to my heart, one with which I believe has a healing process that really needs to be communicated about more openly and to a greater extent.

To me, these photos capture a sense of movement. I wanted to evoke feelings within each viewer; to imagine themselves within each moment and come to their own conclusions through self reflection.

Lagom

Lagom

Just the right amount.

I can’t remember a time I haven’t felt a strong connection to photography. Being able to photograph the world as I see it and then share that with others gives me great joy. 

A word with no literal english translation except something along the lines of “just right”, Lagom seemed the perfect word to choose for my photo series.

I found out last year that someone close to me has suffered from an eating disorder for nearly half of her life. It crept into her life ever so slowly over the years, seeking control. I may never personally know the amount of courage and determination it takes to get through an eating disorder, but I sure know the incredible inspiration of the woman she is to me, and how privileged I feel to have the chance to photograph this journey of hers.

Through the years I have known her and through the chats we’ve had regarding this photo series, we decided on the word Lagom and how her body is just right. No body is perfect; I hope we allhave the ability to come to terms with that at some point in our lives. This series was not about documenting an eating disorder, but a way to illustrate an individual healing process and journey of self acceptance.

Staying grounded amongst nature and being connected with her body and mind is something essential to her personal self acceptance and body-loving healing process. Simple yet fulfilling tasks like her soothing morning coffee, yoga, and being surrounded by nature keep her within each present moment, living mindfully. This is what feel I have captured.

This photography series required capturing photos in black and white. With the ability to strip away even the most vibrant colours and make way for strong emotions and simplicity, I believe black and white photos are classic; they will never grow tired. 

I used black and white through this series to bring strength and emotion to each image; to really freeze each moment and simplify its appearance through photographs to emphasise how uncomplicated these grounding exercises are.

Throughout my photos I have used different settings to convey different emotions and meanings. Wide apertures announce focus of small details while narrow apertures welcome a whole scene. Slow shutter speeds create a sense of calm stillness while fast shutter speeds freeze those moments that we often take for granted.

I also chose to include a double exposure as the last photograph of the series: a thoughtful silhouette juxtaposed with tumbling waves turned right side up. I used these to signify both an overcrowded mind dominated by unhealthy thoughts, and also imply the importance of turning those thoughts on their head to make way for self acceptance and self reflection.

This project has been such an important one for me as it has allowed me to return to my photography background while encouraging me in undertaking the challenge of creating a series of something close to my heart, one with which I believe has a healing process that really needs to be communicated about more openly and to a greater extent.

To me, these photos capture a sense of movement. I wanted to evoke feelings within each viewer; to imagine themselves within each moment and come to their own conclusions through self reflection.

Lagom

Lagom

Just the right amount.

I can’t remember a time I haven’t felt a strong connection to photography. Being able to photograph the world as I see it and then share that with others gives me great joy. 

A word with no literal english translation except something along the lines of “just right”, Lagom seemed the perfect word to choose for my photo series.

I found out last year that someone close to me has suffered from an eating disorder for nearly half of her life. It crept into her life ever so slowly over the years, seeking control. I may never personally know the amount of courage and determination it takes to get through an eating disorder, but I sure know the incredible inspiration of the woman she is to me, and how privileged I feel to have the chance to photograph this journey of hers.

Through the years I have known her and through the chats we’ve had regarding this photo series, we decided on the word Lagom and how her body is just right. No body is perfect; I hope we allhave the ability to come to terms with that at some point in our lives. This series was not about documenting an eating disorder, but a way to illustrate an individual healing process and journey of self acceptance.

Staying grounded amongst nature and being connected with her body and mind is something essential to her personal self acceptance and body-loving healing process. Simple yet fulfilling tasks like her soothing morning coffee, yoga, and being surrounded by nature keep her within each present moment, living mindfully. This is what feel I have captured.

This photography series required capturing photos in black and white. With the ability to strip away even the most vibrant colours and make way for strong emotions and simplicity, I believe black and white photos are classic; they will never grow tired. 

I used black and white through this series to bring strength and emotion to each image; to really freeze each moment and simplify its appearance through photographs to emphasise how uncomplicated these grounding exercises are.

Throughout my photos I have used different settings to convey different emotions and meanings. Wide apertures announce focus of small details while narrow apertures welcome a whole scene. Slow shutter speeds create a sense of calm stillness while fast shutter speeds freeze those moments that we often take for granted.

I also chose to include a double exposure as the last photograph of the series: a thoughtful silhouette juxtaposed with tumbling waves turned right side up. I used these to signify both an overcrowded mind dominated by unhealthy thoughts, and also imply the importance of turning those thoughts on their head to make way for self acceptance and self reflection.

This project has been such an important one for me as it has allowed me to return to my photography background while encouraging me in undertaking the challenge of creating a series of something close to my heart, one with which I believe has a healing process that really needs to be communicated about more openly and to a greater extent.

To me, these photos capture a sense of movement. I wanted to evoke feelings within each viewer; to imagine themselves within each moment and come to their own conclusions through self reflection.

Lagom

Lagom

Just the right amount.

I can’t remember a time I haven’t felt a strong connection to photography. Being able to photograph the world as I see it and then share that with others gives me great joy. 

A word with no literal english translation except something along the lines of “just right”, Lagom seemed the perfect word to choose for my photo series.

I found out last year that someone close to me has suffered from an eating disorder for nearly half of her life. It crept into her life ever so slowly over the years, seeking control. I may never personally know the amount of courage and determination it takes to get through an eating disorder, but I sure know the incredible inspiration of the woman she is to me, and how privileged I feel to have the chance to photograph this journey of hers.

Through the years I have known her and through the chats we’ve had regarding this photo series, we decided on the word Lagom and how her body is just right. No body is perfect; I hope we allhave the ability to come to terms with that at some point in our lives. This series was not about documenting an eating disorder, but a way to illustrate an individual healing process and journey of self acceptance.

Staying grounded amongst nature and being connected with her body and mind is something essential to her personal self acceptance and body-loving healing process. Simple yet fulfilling tasks like her soothing morning coffee, yoga, and being surrounded by nature keep her within each present moment, living mindfully. This is what feel I have captured.

This photography series required capturing photos in black and white. With the ability to strip away even the most vibrant colours and make way for strong emotions and simplicity, I believe black and white photos are classic; they will never grow tired. 

I used black and white through this series to bring strength and emotion to each image; to really freeze each moment and simplify its appearance through photographs to emphasise how uncomplicated these grounding exercises are.

Throughout my photos I have used different settings to convey different emotions and meanings. Wide apertures announce focus of small details while narrow apertures welcome a whole scene. Slow shutter speeds create a sense of calm stillness while fast shutter speeds freeze those moments that we often take for granted.

I also chose to include a double exposure as the last photograph of the series: a thoughtful silhouette juxtaposed with tumbling waves turned right side up. I used these to signify both an overcrowded mind dominated by unhealthy thoughts, and also imply the importance of turning those thoughts on their head to make way for self acceptance and self reflection.

This project has been such an important one for me as it has allowed me to return to my photography background while encouraging me in undertaking the challenge of creating a series of something close to my heart, one with which I believe has a healing process that really needs to be communicated about more openly and to a greater extent.

To me, these photos capture a sense of movement. I wanted to evoke feelings within each viewer; to imagine themselves within each moment and come to their own conclusions through self reflection.

Lagom

Lagom

Just the right amount.

I can’t remember a time I haven’t felt a strong connection to photography. Being able to photograph the world as I see it and then share that with others gives me great joy. 

A word with no literal english translation except something along the lines of “just right”, Lagom seemed the perfect word to choose for my photo series.

I found out last year that someone close to me has suffered from an eating disorder for nearly half of her life. It crept into her life ever so slowly over the years, seeking control. I may never personally know the amount of courage and determination it takes to get through an eating disorder, but I sure know the incredible inspiration of the woman she is to me, and how privileged I feel to have the chance to photograph this journey of hers.

Through the years I have known her and through the chats we’ve had regarding this photo series, we decided on the word Lagom and how her body is just right. No body is perfect; I hope we allhave the ability to come to terms with that at some point in our lives. This series was not about documenting an eating disorder, but a way to illustrate an individual healing process and journey of self acceptance.

Staying grounded amongst nature and being connected with her body and mind is something essential to her personal self acceptance and body-loving healing process. Simple yet fulfilling tasks like her soothing morning coffee, yoga, and being surrounded by nature keep her within each present moment, living mindfully. This is what feel I have captured.

This photography series required capturing photos in black and white. With the ability to strip away even the most vibrant colours and make way for strong emotions and simplicity, I believe black and white photos are classic; they will never grow tired. 

I used black and white through this series to bring strength and emotion to each image; to really freeze each moment and simplify its appearance through photographs to emphasise how uncomplicated these grounding exercises are.

Throughout my photos I have used different settings to convey different emotions and meanings. Wide apertures announce focus of small details while narrow apertures welcome a whole scene. Slow shutter speeds create a sense of calm stillness while fast shutter speeds freeze those moments that we often take for granted.

I also chose to include a double exposure as the last photograph of the series: a thoughtful silhouette juxtaposed with tumbling waves turned right side up. I used these to signify both an overcrowded mind dominated by unhealthy thoughts, and also imply the importance of turning those thoughts on their head to make way for self acceptance and self reflection.

This project has been such an important one for me as it has allowed me to return to my photography background while encouraging me in undertaking the challenge of creating a series of something close to my heart, one with which I believe has a healing process that really needs to be communicated about more openly and to a greater extent.

To me, these photos capture a sense of movement. I wanted to evoke feelings within each viewer; to imagine themselves within each moment and come to their own conclusions through self reflection.